Getting Started with Haptic Feedback (Arduino Guide)

The DRV2605 breakout board from Adafruit.
The DRV2605 breakout board from Adafruit.

Adafruit provides a breakout board for the DRV2605 haptic driver from Texas Instruments. Although the example tutorial included with the product describes a quick way to set up the driver with an eccentric rotating mass (ERM) motor, we prefer using a linear resonant actuator (LRA) for increased precision and enhanced haptic feedback. You can use the breakout board with an Arduino Uno to quickly make a prototype of a system that delivers precise vibrotactile cues.

Materials & Supplies

Hardware

Software

Additional Resources

Creating Haptic Feedback

Step 1: Soldering

The DRV2605 breakout board attached to a LRA.
The DRV2605 breakout board attached to a LRA.

Solder the header strip onto the breakout board, and solder the LRA onto the breakout board. After this step, your DRV2605 breakout board should look like this:

Step 2: Wiring and Hookup

  • Connect VIN on the DRV2605 to the 5V supply of the Arduino
  • Connect GND on the DRV2605 to GND on the Arduino
  • Connect the SCL pin to the I2C clock SCL pin on your Arduino, which is labelled A5
  • Connect the SDA pin to the I2C data SDA pin on your Arduino, which is labelled A4
  • Connect the IN pin to an I/O pin, such as A3

Step 3: Testing and Creating Effects

Adafruit provides a very useful Arduino library for the DRV2605 that you can use to get started. In particular, we recommend looking through the example code to get an idea of the effects you can produce. In page 57 and 58 of the DRV2605 datasheet, you can find a table of all the effects you can produce “out of the box.”

Step 4: Creating Your Own Waveforms

Since you can also set the intensity of the LRA in realtime, you can design your own waveforms and effects by changing the value over time. Adafruit also provides an example for setting the value in realtime on Github. You can combine this example code with a waveform design tool like Macaron to customize the feedback provided by your new Arduino-powered haptic device!

Moment is Made in the USA

Printed circuit board being assembled.
We’re proud to be based in Phoenix, Arizona. Our main office is located at the Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation, but we can’t contribute our part to the American economy by shipping jobs overseas. That’s why Moment is made in the USA.

We work with local companies whenever we can. For manufacturing and assembly, we work with Quiktek Assembly in Tempe, Arizona. For component sourcing, we work with Avnet, a leading electronics distributor headquartered in Phoenix. Many of our primary partners are within a quick 15-minute drive from our office, and we also are working to source all of our plastics and miscellaneous parts from local distributors.

Beyond keeping Americans employed, we can guarantee a few things almost every big brand (including the ones named after fruit) cannot:

  • we pay fair wages
  • we never employ underage workers
  • our facilities are powered by cleaner sources of energy
  • we recycle whenever possible
  • we meet all EPA regulations

Map of where we product our products.We produce and assemble our products in the United States, and we’re always looking for opportunities to bring jobs back here to the USA. It’s the only way we can ensure we deliver an honest, high-quality product that isn’t subsidized by environmental catastrophe and unfair practices. Continue reading “Moment is Made in the USA”

3D Printing: Ready for mass market?

Shrek 3D Print

While revising the 3D design for Moment, I started off using a Makerbot Replicator at TechShop. These machines were the first to usher in an era of accessible consumer 3D printing. The bundled software is easy to use, and the printers generally work well. That said, with a $2,000 price tag, they aren’t truly accessible to the average consumer, and a TechShop membership can also be expensive if you don’t use it regularly. With affordable rapid-prototyping in mind, I began asking “Can you get started 3D printing for less?”.

Now, with the Monoprice MP Select Mini, you can. At an MSRP of $200, I decided to get one and try it out for myself. It doesn’t disappoint. It works with a wide range of filaments (ABS, PLA, XT Copolyester, PET, TPU, TPC, FPE, PVA, HIPS, Jelly, Foam, Felty), including a PLA-based wooden filament from Hatchbox. After 3D printing a few models of Shrek and some geometric Pokemon, I was impressed.

Pokemon 3D Print

The Good

  • absurdly cheap ($200)
  • heated print bed
  • compatible with many different filaments
  • solid exterior built of steel and aluminum (very few plastic parts)
  • full color LCD display on the printer
  • MicroSD card slot
  • works with Cura software from Ultimaker
  • possibly capable of connecting to wifi networks in a future firmware update
  • print bed leveled out of the box
  • active user community
  • 1-year limited warranty
  • extremely accurate Z-axis motor (possibly more than 100 micron resolution)

The Bad

  • limited print space (120x120x120 millimeters)
  • very minimal instructions – debugging can be hard
  • cheap built plate material (scratches easily)
  • imprecise temperature regulation
  • no enclosure or hood around prints
  • non-standard parts that require warranty replacement or buying a new printer

Conclusion

If you’re looking to get started with 3D printing, or want to try out different filament types inexpensively, buy this printer. Its price sets it apart from the competition. Any comparable printer is easily 3x the price, but the additional cost may also come with improved reliability—only time will tell whether the MP Select Mini is a durable product.

Our 10 Favorite Phoenix Coffee Shops for Productivity

Giant

Giant is our favorite place to work, as long as it isn’t too crowded – its clean interior has a variety of places to sit and work – bar stools, regular tables, benches, and cushioned seats. During the day, it’s often very quiet, but sometimes it can be crowded at peak hours.

Giant Coffee

Lux

Although it can be loud at times, Lux is a very large coffee shop with a lot of space. A single cup of drip coffee also buys you unlimited refills, so you can sit and work for several hours as long as you don’t mind a little bit of a crowd. For those looking to work into the hours of the evening (something startup founders may be a bit too familiar with), Lux also offers many local beers on tap, providing a lively evening work environment.

Lux at Central

Continue reading “Our 10 Favorite Phoenix Coffee Shops for Productivity”

The Best Coworking Spaces in Phoenix

As more freelancers, small business owners, and startups get started in Phoenix, an increasing number of office spaces are now coworking spaces – buildings that house people from a diverse range of backgrounds, each with their own line of work. Below, you’ll find a list of the best coworking spaces in Phoenix.

Photograph of the interior of CO+HOOTS

CO+HOOTS

CO+HOOTS is a coworking space that also provides programming and events focused on helping entrepreneurs create successful businesses. The space is shared between individuals and growing businesses, and the community consists of designers, architects, lawyers, PR agents, software developers, startups, real estate agents, and photographers.

Restaurants Nearby

Coffee Shops Nearby

Continue reading “The Best Coworking Spaces in Phoenix”

The Future of 4D Home Cinema: A Haptic Effects Track

Diagram of 4D Movie Theater
Diagram of a 4D movie theater from Wikipedia.

With the rise of Netflix and Youtube as dominant platforms for video consumption, fewer people are visiting theaters to watch movies. An increasing amount of multimedia content will be designed for the home theater as these streaming services grow their libraries. Netflix users consume content on whichever screen is available: a laptop, tablet, or smartphone. As the user experience for content consumption shifts towards mobile applications and at-home viewing, the interactive elements of 3D and 4D film previously reserved for movie theaters will transition to technologies easily adopted by households.

Good video is engaging – it tells a compelling story with excellent production value. Since there is increasing competition for viewership between different streaming platforms, devices, and content production studios, there is an increasing demand for differentiated content – content that provides a unique experience to its viewers. Continue reading “The Future of 4D Home Cinema: A Haptic Effects Track”

The Haptic Breakdown: What’s Inside Your Smartwatch

In this post, we’ll look at the different ways that some of the most popular wearables implement haptics. Outside of the Apple Watch, most wearables use a simple eccentric rotating mass motor for haptic feedback.

Apple Watch

The Apple Watch was first introduced in the fall of 2014 and has since become the world’s best selling wearable device. It was Apple’s first introduction of its “Taptic Engine”, which provides haptic feedback for alerts and notifications. While the design of the Taptic Engine module is proprietary, it is likely a customized linear resonant actuator.

Continue reading “The Haptic Breakdown: What’s Inside Your Smartwatch”

How It Works: Linear Resonant Actuators

Diagram of a linear resonant actuator.
Diagram of the construction of a linear resonant actuator.

A linear resonant actuator is a vibration motor that produces an oscillating force across a single axis. Unlike a DC eccentric rotating mass (ERM) motor, a linear resonant actuator relies on an AC voltage to drive a voice coil pressed against a moving mass connected to a spring. When the voice coil is driven at the resonant frequency of the spring, the entire actuator vibrates with a perceptible force. Although the frequency and amplitude of a linear resonant actuator may be adjusted by changing the AC input, the actuator must be driven at its resonant frequency to generate a meaningful amount of force for a large current.

Continue reading “How It Works: Linear Resonant Actuators”

How do devices provide haptic feedback?

Video game controllers, cell phones, wearables, and dozens of other consumer electronic devices make use of vibrotactile feedback to increase user engagement. There are three different types of hardware most frequently used to provide haptic feedback: eccentric rotating mass motors, linear resonant actuators, and piezoelectric actuators.

Continue reading “How do devices provide haptic feedback?”